12月のコラムは先端生命科学専攻 石川麻乃准教授です。(写真に続きコラムがございます。)

大入りの会場で、子供にマイクを取られそうになりながら講演する筆者。大会実行委員会により、スクリーン前にキッズスペースが設けられた。The author giving a speech at a crowded venue, with her child who reaches out to touch the microphone. The committee has set up a children’s space in front of the screen.

講演中、キッズスペースのマットの上で思い思いに寛ぐ子供たち。講演者の子供も親が近くにいるため安心して遊んでいる。During the lecture, children were relaxing on the mats in the kids space. The children of the speakers also feel safe playing because their parents are nearby.

企画者・講演者と、シンポジウムに参加してくれた子供たちで記念撮影。大会を通じて子供同士も仲良くなり、最後には寂しくて泣いてしまう子もいたとのこと。
A commemorative photo of organizers/speakers and the children who participated in the symposium. Throughout the event, the children became friends with each other, and some of the children were sad and cried when they parted ways after the symposium ended.

写真:松前ひろみ様 提供 All photos provided by Hiromi Matsumae

 12月のコラム
■■ 先端生命科学専攻
■■■ 石川麻乃准教授

2021年春に柏の葉に着任してから、3度目の冬を迎えた。その間、妊娠、出産、ワンオペ育児の開始、と、ライフイベントが怒涛のように押し寄せ、毎日が一瞬にして飛び去っていくような、それでいて、もうずっと長くこのキャンパスにいるような不思議な感覚を抱いている。1歳児のワンオペ育児と研究の両立を目指す毎日は、借り入れと返済を繰り返す正に自転車操業で、このコラムの原稿も御多分に洩れず、〆切を大幅に過ぎており、平身低頭である。

 とはいえ、この間までむっちりとした新生児だった子が、つかまり立ちし、歩くようになると、ほんの少しずつ、自分自身も研究活動の場に戻ることができるようになってきた。その一つが、学会や研究会への参加だ。日々の生活もままならない親1人子1人の状況で、何も好き好んで知らない土地に殴り込みに行かなくても良いのだが、着任前からコロナ禍で対面交流を渇望していた身として、再開し始めた現地開催学会への参加は、今年、何としても成し遂げたい課題だった。

 「いけるんじゃない?」と思わせてくれたのは、コロナ禍前、スイスのワークショップでご一緒した女性研究者の姿だった。欧州、北米、日本の研究者15名ほどで総説を書こう!と集まった場に、彼女は首が座る前の赤ちゃんと参加していた。付き添っていたのは、彼女のお父さん(赤ちゃんのおじいちゃん)で、議論が白熱する部屋の窓から、ベビーカーで散歩する2人の姿が見えた。ワークショップ後半には、みんなが作業するテーブルの上に赤ちゃんがころんと転がっていた。そうか、こんな在り方があるんだ、と驚嘆した情景が、背中を押してくれた。

 今年の夏、私が講演したシンポジウムは、その名も「進化学者が子を抱えてガッツリ研究発表する。果たして無事終えることができるのか?!」である。タイトル通り、講演者5名中4名が会場に子供を連れながら、本気で研究発表をした。私もタイトルを体現するべく、子を抱っこして講演してみた。開催地・沖縄の朗らかな空気と、実行委員会の細やかな気遣いに助けられ、会場は立ち見が出る盛況ぶりで、シンポジウムは大成功だった(※)。

 それから早3ヶ月、ちょうちょ!と呟きながら草むらを走るようになった子を見て、次はどの学会に参加しようか、と腕まくりしている。そしてその姿が、次の誰かの「いけるんじゃない?」になるといいな、と願っている。

♦シンポジウムの詳細や学会の子連れ参加者へのサポートについては日本進化学会ニュースの特集記事として掲載されます。(3月頃一般公開の予定)

♦また、東大男女共同参画室の中野円佳先生による、東洋経済ONLINEの記事でも今回のシンポジウムを紹介していただきました。
https://toyokeizai.net/articles/-/706609

⇐ 2023年11月のコラム  2024年1月のコラム ⇒

 December Issue
■■ Department of Integrated Biosciences
■■■ Associate Professor Ishikawa Asano

Since arriving at Kashiwa-no-ha in the spring of 2021, I have now experienced my third winter. During this time, life events such as pregnancy, childbirth, and the start of solo-parenting(ワンオペ育児), have surged like a raging river. Each day seems to fly by in an instant, yet I find myself with a strange sense of having been on this campus for a long time. Balancing solo-parenting a one-year-old with research feels like a constant cycle of borrowing and repaying, akin to a precarious balancing act on a bicycle. Even this column’s manuscript, true to form, has far surpassed its deadline, and I am humbly apologetic.

Nevertheless, as my once plump newborn has learned to stand and walk, I have gradually found my way back to engaging in research activities. One of these activities includes participating in academic conferences and research meetings. Despite the challenges of being a single parent to a one-year-old and managing research, I have resumed attending local conferences. During a life where managing day-to-day activities is a struggle for a solo-parenting parent with one child, I could have avoided venturing into unfamiliar territory. However, as someone who has longed for in-person interactions even before my arrival during the COVID-19 pandemic, participating in locally held conferences has become a goal I am determined to achieve this year.

What gave me the confidence to pursue this was the sight of a female researcher I had shared a workshop within Switzerland before the pandemic. In a gathering of around 15 researchers from Europe, North America, and Japan, she participated with her baby, whose neck was not yet table. Accompanying her was her father (the baby’s grandfather), and from the window of the room where heated discussions took place, I could see the two taking a stroll with a stroller. In the latter part of the workshop, the baby was lying on the table where everyone was working. Witnessing this touching scene inspired me, showing me that there is a way to balance motherhood and academic pursuits.

This summer, I organized a symposium titled “Evolutionary Biologists Delivering Research Presentations While Holding Their Children. Can They Successfully Finish?!” As the title suggests, four out of five presenters, including myself, delivered research presentations while bringing their children to the venue. To embody the title, I held my child while I gave my presentation. Thanks to the cheerful atmosphere of Okinawa and the meticulous care of the organizing committee, the venue was so lively that there were standing-room-only attendees, making the symposium a great success (※).

Since then, as I watch my child running through the grass while murmuring “butterfly,” I roll up my sleeves, wondering which academic conference to attend next. I hope that my journey becomes someone else’s source of inspiration, a whisper that says, “You can do it.”

♦ Details of the symposium and support for attendees with children at academic conferences will be featured in a special article in the Japan Society of Evolutionary Studies News (scheduled for general release around March).

♦ Also, this symposium was introduced in an article on Toyo Keizai ONLINE by Project Assistant Professor Nakano Madoka, Office for Gender Equality, the University of Tokyo.
https://toyokeizai.net/articles/-/706609

 

⇐ Previous month    next month  ⇒